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the brown act which gave california its open meetings laws, and in a little-noticed act, he signed the bill that ended legal racial segregation in california schools. i'll return to that in just a minute. he was, through all of that, a guy gantically dominant figure in california politics. he was elected three times, 1942, 1946 and 1950, each a race of some historic importance. he is, by the way, the only person elected three times to govern california. in 1942 he beat an incumbent democrat, olson, despite fdr's popularity nationally and within the state, despite the fact that the state and country were at war. in 1950, his last election, he did one better than beating an ally of fdr, he beat fdr's son, jimmy roosevelt, by more than a million votes. and in 1946's election he achieved the remarkable and by today's standards sort of unimaginable feat of winning not only the republican party nomination for governor, but the democratic nomination as well. [laughter] yeah. give that a moment's thought. [laughter] um, he is the only person ever nominated by both parties to govern california. it w
one of the things that has stuck with me is yon black and brown men, young boys are not accepting. culturally part of it is societal but the dinosaur had the ice age. we have education and technology. they did not make the adjustment it is not here. if the black brown mail this not make the adjustment they will not be here. we have to make it safe for our children to be smart, respectful, individua ls because what i was a boy i wanted to be excepted so bad i or myself to me i try. i will never let that happen again. to say if i cannot change the people around me you have to be afraid to stand by yourself that is the clearest it will ever be. there is a tendency to be accepted so bad people have all kinds of estimations but a man would do anything to take care of the family. not that i would not do that. and a woman sought a man who do anything you could do it every wanted the you will deal with the man. but we left young boys like you by yourself to figure out. so that is to make it safe quote for the boys to grow. [applause] scott. >> my father used to say not making a choice is
is something that haunts them for the rest of his career that has to do with his memos and the browned keyboard education case. why do you tell us what his role wasn't quite turned out to be controversial? >> guest: he wrote a lot of memos in those memos doubled out in stage in a very rough sequence over many years later. what he did, so he gets there and percolating up through the courts already going back to 1950 are the cases of the naacp legal and education defense fund that thurgood marshall is actually bringing and he is building at sort of brick by brick, block by block or go thurgood marshall not yet of course the justice of the supreme court. he is making the case that plessy versus ferguson and, which defined the acceptability of separate but equal, they are making the case to the naacp that this cannot be, cannot remain the law of the land and it is pretty clear that the case that is going to become a very important one for the court and it's actually a year that rehnquist is there is brown versus board of education. which turns out in fact to be the case that strikes that document d
as a future presidential hopeful. for example, scott brown hadn't even been sworn in yet in massachusetts, and the url scott brown -- or scott brown twinkled.com was already purchased. but so many women have been in washington for so many years as legislators and working on important work come and get their names never bubbled to the top. we were curious why not. >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? all three of you studied similar topics, but how did this book actually come about? >> your idea, ted. spent i guess it was my idea. i've been a political nerd since i was, you know, i don't, my parents still remember my sister and i in 1960 staging a nixon-kennedy debate. my owl the beat her rabbit. and during all of those years of nerd am, -- nerdom, a magazine issues had come out way in advance of the presidential election, that we previewed the eight or 10 or 12 people who ought to be considered. and it is simply struck me after seeing so many of those issues in so many magazines that women were not making it on to that list. they were not being thought to be presidential.
he is a hopeful scott brown was not even sworn been and scott brown 2012.com was already purchase. but so many women had been in washington as legislators working on important work but we were curious why not? >> how did you decide to write the book? you have studied similar topics but how did that come about? >> i guess it was my idea. my parents still remember my sister and by staging the annexing kennedy debate. [laughter] mitel a fined beat her rabbit. [laughter] but it was the magazine issues coming out way it in advance to preview the eight or 10 or 12 people who ought to be considered and it struck me with men were not being presidential. evander and addis an academic that was the origin of the book. >> ted originally proposed this so you can take conference papers in to a publication. we each did two with men there was an editor who was in the audience who said can you expand this? we said sure. then it was picking and choosing the. >> often i hear people say i don't know who they are. little known on the national stage. why not? >> i think and know the answer. is there a
the bill that cuts would has browned potatoes and onions because i have never tasted before. honored departure she wrote a letter to ronald reagan describing the time she had spent in america doing what she liked best, looking at beautiful thoroughbreds and walking in the wide-open spaces by the absence. the american west had a long held a fascination for the queen. one of her most intriguing american friends has been a monty roberts, a california cowboy who is known as the horse whisperer for his humane techniques to train horses in a circular pen. she was so impressed by what she had read about his approach that she invited him to demonstrate his technique at windsor castle in 1989. come show me this lion's cage of yours, she said. do i need a whip and change? as montae recalled to me, said that not only with the twinkle but that her message addressing him clearly her talent put him at ease. his demonstration was a big success, and the queen and the cowboys struck up a fast. over lunch in the castle garden she asked him numerous questions i saw mine open up, he recalled. when he to
. the impact could be just as significant as the well-known brown v. board of education. the landmark supreme court case in which they declared the state law establishing separate public schools for black and white students was unconstitutional. some seem to think that one of the candidates, and i won't name which one stands for turning black back the clock in many ways so the minority voter participation will play an integral role in picking the winner of this year's presidential election. the town hall meeting tonight will discuss who and why the minority voter participation and awareness can bring power to the previously disenfranchised racial and ethnic minority. the moderator of tonight's meeting is none other than roland martin. you heard him on cnn and you've heard him on that on joyner morning show. he's a national award winning journalist and is also in author, commentator for the cable network where he hosts washington watch with roland martin and a cnn analyst appearing on a variety of the network shows. i'm certainly everyone here has seen or heard of roland martin. so without fur
whose words they immediately obeyed. he culminated the segregationists of will service and after brown versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festi
browns. and they gave bush entrÉe into his own texas rangers, which is one, the only lucrative investment he ever made. he put his vixen a dozen dollars and came away with about $15 million. and this company, smart tag, which started out as a legitimate technology company soon became a republican operation. and it's all good while the republicans are conservative groups should have their websites and so forth. but this is very unusual and i saw george w. bush 43 was fair. the republican committee hosted it websites. hundreds and hundreds of conservative groups were there. again, that is all fine and well. this company, which is highly, highly partisan also overtime required in contracts that i think probably should not have gone to such a partisan company. in the me just say two. one was if you're in the white house to meet your e-mail according to the presidential records are public documents and they're supposed to be hosted on whitehouse.gov. the rose made sure his e-mails were hosted on smart tack in any of his staffers, other people in the white house also had their e-mails there. so
mayor in state history. is that correct? yeah, so he graduated from brown university with a degree in urban studies and during his time at brown he worked as a youth career counselor. he was also on the governors lgbt commission and the main focus of his administration at the moment are early childhood literacy, building an economy focused around art, innovation and technology, and supporting local and community policing initiatives. as the students we are glad to have here as well, rachel stanley is a junior at elon college majoring in international studies with all sorts of minors, political science, and she has worked with refugees and her region. she is the president of halal on her campus and the millennial values fellow so we are pleased that she is back. last but not least, mohammad usman is a senior at depauw university majoring in urban policy and conflict studies with a minor in religious studies. he was a part of the national bioethics bowl, the winning team in the last year so congratulations on that. and before attending depauw was a special assistant in advocate for a
wondered how scott brown one in massachusetts. i lived there and i talk there. there are such things as democrats in massachusetts, but there are more enrolled independent voters. over 40% of voters. usa today said that people are fleeing from the political parties, they don't want to be tied to this political party. they don't want to give situation where you have a congress, where if you want to be on the committee, sir, i do not know you, but let me assume that you are a whiz at math and you know finance and economics and you want to be on the ways and means committee. everything fits. i would say to you if i was one of the party leaders. you know, i am willing to put you on the committee. you can make good laws, but you have to promise before we give you that committee position that you are going to stick with the party line on the these things. you haven't even heard a hearing and you haven't seen the bills, but you have to promise that you're going to stick to the party. that is the way that it works. here are some of my recommendations, proposals, in 2006, the people of washin
to the public schools and when i got into brown studied urban studies there and unlike a lot of folks my age to give back to the city that i thought had given me the opportunity that i had. holyoke is a rich history and is the first city to the committee to make papers we are the paper city. like a lot of cities on the northeast we move the industrial city but folks came in to holyoke and a lot of the factories moved overseas. the unemployment rate is larger or how your domestic and national average about 50% of the population is latino and mostly puerto rican defense and very diverse city as well. so i got elected last november and there's four of us in the election the nonpartisan from the local level to start against each other in november and i went with 53% of the vote and became the mayor in january at the age of 22 and i turned 23 and i will be 24 in january so i quickly getting up there. [laughter] it is a very stressful job, but also very, very rewarding. there's nothing more special than being the mayor in a city that you were born and where your family still lives and your friends
. it was in a brown tablet and you plucked it in water, and drank it and all was made well. it brought comfort to your life. the catalogs at the time were actually magazines. so instead of what we would see at catalog or the montgomery catalog. we have the magazines full of story and in the story you needed to take up thing. would make your life better in some waits, these are a precure or so of social networking. tcht way to bipass advertiser. bipass traditional publishes and sell your product directly to the market. it was late 19th century through mid early 20th century. 1880s to 1930s because particularly augusta had access to the -- [inaudible] and to make paper. water and rail transit, things were published here. it made more sense to actually print the period kls in accuss that and ship them out. augusta has the enormous post office which is a castle. no longer in use as the post office the current post office is a small building. at that time we were shipping incredible amounts of magazines all over the world. .. they published news articles. they publish biographies of the people of the time.
presided over several historic cases including brown versus board of education which desegregated schools griswald katie connecticut which assembles the constitutional right of privacy and prayer in public schools. sworn in as chief justice of the u.s. supreme court on october the fifth 1953. this is a little under an hour. ..
. otherwise, i'm completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in '88. i voted for paul brown, i think -- i can't remember exactly what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. i voted for ross perot once. i'm a very open-minded person but i watch things very closely. >> host: thanks for calling, gary johnson, any reaction to that caller? >> guest: well, just that i think that by going to a national consumption tax, one federal national consumption tax. i think that really is a lot more fair. i would like to point out that it ended up being cost neutral over a fairly short amount of time. so, let's use a can of coke as an example. a can of coke sells for a dollar today. in that dollar is 23% worth of imbedded tax. that's federal tax that coca-cola pays. corporate tax, as -- with social security match, medicare, unemployment, all that goes away. no more with holding from your payroll check. social security, medicare, unemployment would come out of the proceeds of the fair tax. so you bleed all that existing tax out of the coke can that sells for a buck. coke doesn't have to sell that c
for ron paul. i voted for paul brown. i cannot remember what year he ran. i voted for ross perot once. i am very open-minded better watch things closely. >> host: thank you for calling. gary johnson and the reaction? >> guest: by going to a national consumption tax one federal national consumption tax is more fair. it is cost neutral over a short amount of time. a can of coca-cola sells $1 today within that is 23% of embedded tax federal tax that coca-cola pays common corporate tax, social security match, medicare, unemploymen t. all of that goes away. no more withholding from the paycheck. so security and medicare comes out of the proceeds. if you believe the existing tax out then they do not have to sell that at $1 anymore now they sell it at $0.80. if you think they will continue to sell it at $1, it is free market and competition. coal is competitive. it will sell about $0.80 which is cost neutral. then to have a raging debate over how you implement one federal consumption tax. was never read tax we get to less of. today we tax them come and we're getting less of that. added score it
and are they even still that strong nowadays when you have scott brown -- sorry, scott walker in wisconsin able to defeated them a couple of times. in ohio they did take some hits. curious as to hear your view. >> on the future i can't really say. i can just go back to 2010 where three of the top five spending outside groups were unions. that was reported in "the wall street journal" and i think there's a whole slew of research to back out of. maybe not on television but in other ways the unions spend money. at this point they're very strong stomach look, like any other -- >> look like any other sector, they would have a problem, and i think that's the case for everything, for everybody, or a company. to have to think about new and unique ways of getting at the heart of what they care about. there's a whole history whether it's civil rights or women's rights for workers rights what people remember what unions were created in the first place. most of the world today has no recollection of why that happen. they don't know that god work 18 hours, you got paid a number that couldn't even let you li
perspective where president obama is clearly going to run very well there. canned scott brown withstand the blue tide fair and right now, the democrats are doing well. you have a tea party backed candidate in indiana, richard mourdock and richard luke are in the primary. that is a very tight race but you have solid republican candidates. i was in missouri may be a month ago but in arizona where democrats are competitive and i think it just shows that one these races are still fluid. you can be and decided and we can say the race for president started with undecided voters yesterday. for some of these voters the senate race, it's going to be a couple of weeks before they really engage. the other thing that is going on here is, i don't know if people vote in races like a chess game but i do think you know, people pick and choose one from a i'll m and one from i obey. clearly one thing we haven't talked about is the fundamental dissatisfaction americans have with government and as they go from president incented and governor, how do they make those choices? >> look, i have to agree with fr
there and went to the city schools. when i got into brown i studied urban studies fair and unlike a lot of folks my age i just come back to my hometown and give back to the city that i thought i given me the opportunities that i had. holyoke has a rich history. it was the first place involve the ball in the first industrial city in the entire united states and the first to make paper or so we are nicknamed the paper city. like a lot of cities in the northeast we were once a booming industrial city but at the same time folks came into holyoke and a lot of the factories closed or moved overseas so we right now have a high of 11% employment -- unemployment rate. about 50% of our population is latino mostly puerto rican descent and a diversity as well. so i got elected last november. there were four of us running in the election. and nonpartisan race on the local level so the top vote getters faced off against each other in november. i won with 53% of the vote and i became mayor in january at the age of 22. then i turned 23 and i will be 24 and january so i'm quickly getting up there. [laughter] is
was campaigning my entire senior year at brown. i came back against other folks established in politics. i think people recognize my election is unique and people wanted something different. so the folks on the council just gets tiring after a while. we really want to support, for example, to be realized. i think there's some great veteran city counselor. you know, joe mcgivern one for example a supporter of me to make sure we get the mayor the tools he needs to proceed, beat displeasure with? priorities for the city, so i found while people will be opposed to never vote for me, it is really about the people and keep in touch with the people. when i'm having a bad day or politics as discouraging me coming in now, in an afternoon, for example, just walk outside of city hall and have a conversation with someone saying you're doing a great job. i remember meeting you last year. forever negative story of his job, there's 10 more people coming up in thanking you for everything you're doing. that is the most important part of the job. it's not about people with the money, people like to marry you. it'
. national vice president nancy brown park from california. national secretary mary buckler from indiana. [applause] we also have several pass national president joining us today. i would like for them to stand and be recognized. with us it is a national commander of the sons of the american legion from the department of pennsylvania. chris, please stand and be recognized. [applause] in addition several of the men present dedicated their lives to service national commanders of the sons of the american legion. gentlemen, will you please stand and be recognized. most important i would like to take this opportunity to introduce and thank my wonderful wife, vicki, my best friend. vicky. [applause] a month from now you a citizen will go to the polls across the country and cast ballots in a general election. washington will be focused on the great landscape beyond the beltway. that's where i come from. that's what you find american legion. you will find american legion rural towns on the west hoping veterans make that for our trip to va medical center. american legion's hosting more than 200 j
afghanistan and iraq because cheney wanted to help out his buddies at brown and root and halliburton and grab up all the oil. i think they went soft on the project because they were worried about upsetting their saudi arabian royalty bodies. so now, osama bin laden finally is gunned down by barack obama displayed great courage and great intelligence. what more do you want for a country that not an encouraging that kind of intelligence? >> our final offer a genetic test to's favorite sycophant or like to call them can make you go seanez favorite display. if you are sean penn -- look, if you are sean penn and if something really asinine you have to get out there, where you go? that's right, piers morgan. on october 14 to mr. penn delivered one of the most asinine comments every national television. can we call cnn national television anymore? and even worse, he insisted that we know this -- she insisted we note this is his original thought. he came up with it. >> he has what i call get the word out of the white house. at the end of the day there is a big couple saying, can we just luncheon? >>
nowadays when you have scott browne -- scott walker in wisconsin able it defeat them a couple of times in ohio they did take some hits. i'm curious to hear that. >> yeah. >> you can start. >> i don't know. on the future, i can't say. i do know, i can go back to 2010 three of the top five spending outside groups were unions. that was reported the wall street jowrnt and i think there's a whole slew of research to back it up. it maybe not on television in other ways they spend money. it's strong in terms of the future of it. i turn it over to maggie. >> like any other sort of sector, if unions don't inte elevate they'll have a problem. i think that's the case for everything, everybody. for a company they have to think about new and unique ways gifting the heart of what they care about. there's a whole history whether it's civil rights, workers rights, or women's rights where people remember why unioners created. most of the world has no rex why it happened. you had to work 18 hours and never got overtime. you got paid a number you live in a town which you work. people don't understand whe
the course of two years. tom hendricks who since moved on and steve brown for tremendous work. literally, hundreds of volunteers working in work groups and task groups led by rtca with margaret jenni, and i want to thank everybody for the help over the years. just as the members are engaged in our work, we've been very pleased with the knowledge and level of engagement by acting administrator, first serving as the faa deputy administrator, mike call's become more, not less active in the work since being elevated to the role of acting administrator. with michael at the helm, his interests, and working closely with the community, i'm confident in the ability to overcome barriers to implementing next generation. you commented about succession planning, and i'm pleased with my chairmanmanship sunsetting, and i'll remain on the committee, bill ayer, chairman of the alaska air group, and bill's been formally leading the alaska air group as chairman and ceo, an experienced aveuater, is taking over the chairmanmanship on a go-forward basis passing the baton at wright patterson air force base her
president nancy brown park from california. the national secretary mary buckler from indiana. [applause] we also have several past national president of the oxalate joining us today. i would like for them to stand and be recognized. with us today is the national commander of the american legion. chris from the department of pennsylvania. chris, please stand and be recognized. [applause] in addition, several of the men present serve as the national commander as the songs of the american legion. gentlemen, would you please stand and be recognized? >> most importantly, i would like to take this opportunity to introduce and thank my wonderful wife, my best friend, the vicki. [applause] a month from now u.s. citizens will go over the poles across the country from the cast ballots in the general election. we will be focused on the great landscape beyond the beltway. that's where i come from and you will find the american legion. you will find the town's in the west helping the veterans meet that trip to the medical center. the american legion is promoting and hosting more than 200 job fears throu
brown is the author. what is a gay writer? >> is writing about gay men and women about their firsthand experience in their fiction and their poetry and in their place. you're not pretending to be some of somebody you're not. you are telling the truth from your own firsthand experience. the book, i talk about, i wasn't qualified to include women too. but so many gay and lesbians both are writing from their firsthand experiences you might who are some of the early gay american writers a profile? >> i begin with truman capote, who published their first major books within weeks of each other. i follow that with allen ginsberg, james baldwin, christopher isherwood, tennessee williams was also working at this time too, this is like the first wave, and they caught a lot of grief for what they wrote. right after world war ii, homosexuality was illegal in all 48 states. you couldn't talk openly as a gay person. but you could write fiction about it and say i'm not writing about myself, i'm writing about these other people who are fictional. everybody saw through this white lie and understood wha
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26